Hell Raiders 1982

The story of Indonesia's fight for independence from the Dutch.

Mati O Manush

Mati O Manush, originally called Amar Desh, was a pioneering television programme in Bangladesh Television. The programme started in the mid-1980s and focused on the agricultural sector of Bangladesh. The show was jointly hosted by Rezaul Karim Siddique and Shykh Seraj. Rezaul Karim Siddique was involved in this program on January 1983. In 1985, the show's title was changed from Amar Desh to Mati O Manush. At that time, the producer, Alimuzzaman, picked Shykh Siraj as another anchor in this program. Seraj left in 1996. Dewan Siraz was made Siddique's co-anchor of this program until he left Bangladesh for overseas job. Shykh Seraj started a new programme at Channel i named Hridoye Mati O Manush. Mati O Manush is the most popular and oldest program of Bangladesh Television. Afterwards, most Bangladesh TV channels produced a program about agriculture that was based on the Mati O Manush model. The program made agriculture a more prestigious profession in Bangladesh.

The Morning Show 2019

A behind-the-scenes look at the lives of the people who help America wake up in the morning, exploring the unique challenges faced by the men and women who carry out this daily televised ritual.

Matinee Theater 1955

Matinee Theater is an American anthology series that aired on NBC during the Golden Age of Television, from 1955 to 1958. The series, which ran daily in the afternoon, was frequently live. It was produced by Albert McCleery, Darrell Ross, George Cahan and Frank Price with executive producer George Lowther. McCleery had previously produced the live series Cameo Theatre which introduced to television the concept of theater-in-the-round, TV plays staged with minimal sets. Jim Buckley of the Pewter Plough Playhouse recalled: When Al McCleery got back to the States, he originated a most ambitious theatrical TV series for NBC called Matinee Theater: to televise five different stage plays per week live, airing around noon in order to promote color TV to the American housewife as she labored over her ironing. Al was the producer. He hired five directors and five art directors. Richard Bennett, one of our first early presidents of the Pewter Plough Corporation, was one of the directors and I was one of the art directors and, as soon as we were through televising one play, we had lunch and then met to plan next week’s show. That was over 50 years ago, and I’m trying to think; I believe the TV art director is his own set decorator —yes, of course! It had to be, since one of McCleery’s chief claims to favor with the producers was his elimination of the setting per se and simply decorating the scene with a minimum of props. It took a bit of ingenuity.

Mike and Maty

Mike and Maty was a daytime talk show that aired on ABC from April 11, 1994, to June 7, 1996, replacing The Home Show, a daytime/nighttime informational talk show that aired on ABC from 1988 to 1994. Hosted by Michael Burger and Maty Monfort, the series covered an array of subjects on each episode. Guests included celebrities and authors, as well as cooking, health, beauty and fitness experts. Some shows featured Michael Kearney as a special correspondent. Mike and Maty was replaced by Caryl & Marilyn: Real Friends, a talk show hosted by the comedic duo known as The Mommies, which in turn was canceled after eleven months and replaced in 1997 by The View, which currently occupies the timeslot.

Aino Mating Agency Inc 2017

Aino Hingo used to work as an associate professor of ethnology. He now works as the director of a matchmaking agency. His assistant is Sister Elizabeth. The high entrance fee at the matchmaking agency is two million yen, but the matchmaking agency has a 100% success rating for their clients getting married. They match customers based on the client's conditions. The secret behind their 100% marriage rate is Shingo Aino's counseling, relying on his knowledge in ethology.

Matinee at the Bijou

Matinee at the Bijou was a television series that premiered nationally on PBS in 1980. It recreated the American moviegoing experiences of the 1930s and '40s, with trailers, a cartoon, one or more selected short subjects, a cliff-hanging serial chapter “to be continued,” and a tightly edited feature presentation. The 90-minute series ran for five consecutive first-run seasons, each consisting of 16 episodes, and continued on PBS for three subsequent years in reruns. The series was an independent production from Bijou Productions, Inc., of Medford, Oregon.