Cook & Peary: The Race to the Pole 1983

Cook and Peary: The Race to the Pole is an unabashedly biased recreation of the controversy concerning the "conquering" of the North Pole. Robert E. Peary (Rod Steiger), a US Navy commander and shameless self-promoter, sets out through Arctic wastes in 1909 to discover the Pole, an expedition that many others have attempted but failed to complete. His principal rival is Dr. Frederick A. Cook (Richard Chamberlain), who insists that he'd already reached the Pole in 1908. Though the experts (and the US Congress) conclude that Perry was first, public opinion is firmly in Cook's corner--as is this TV movie.

A Dancer 1991

Part of the By Herself series of individual dramas created for Channel 4, A dancer explores the emotional moment when two former lovers, separated by their profession, meet again.

Jailbirds 1991

Personalities clash when a city executive and a small town seamstress are thrown into jail for crimes they didn't commit and then escape, handcuffed together.

Lisa, Bright and Dark 1973

Three teenage girls try to help their girlfriend, who is having a nervous breakdown that conventional therapy seems to be failing to remedy.

The Man Who Lived at the Ritz 1989

In this drama, an American art student is trapped amidst the political turmoil of war-torn Europe while visiting Paris and staying at the fabulous Ritz hotel. Rather than cope constructively with it all, the fellow opts to ignore it and continue living the high-life for as long as possible.

Het landhuis 1989

1989. Hugo (Michael Pas) is in his first master's year economics. At the same time he is training for the 110 meter hurdles. And he has another sport: chasing girls. But when his latest catch (Antje De Boeck) suddenly disappears, he's obsessively starts looking for her. She seems to have ended up in an idyllic, utopian countryhouse.

Rickover: The Birth of Nuclear Power 2014

Dive into the life of the father of the nuclear Navy: Hyman Rickover. Combative, provocative, and blunt, Admiral Hyman G. Rickover was a flamboyant maverick and a unique American hero. When few thought it possible, then-Captain Rickover harnessed the power of the atom to drive the first nuclear-powered submarine, the USS Nautilus, whose trip under the polar ice pack was one of the great adventure stories of the 1950s. Later, Rickover built the world's first nuclear aircraft carrier and the first commercial nuclear power plant at Shippingport, PA. Rickover's achievements made him into a national celebrity, and he appeared on the cover of Time magazine. Many wonder whether America can maintain its technological pre-eminence and whether we can still build and manage large-scale projects. To understand these issues, Rickover considers the story of the man who created the nuclear Navy as well as the civilian nuclear power industry: Hyman G. Rickover.